Page 1 of 2 :

This project blog »

Bookmarks

Feedback Feedback

Inappropriate material?
Ideas? Technical issues?
» Feedback to a-n

Project blogs

Concrete (Breton) Brut

By: Peter Wylie

The visionary council housing developments of the 1960's may be far from the decaying estates of today, but can we embrace their utopianism. My paintings deal with the now and the then, the optimism contasting with the look of wear and tear from the years in between.  Been getting a lot of good reviews and encouragement...now I have a show to put on in April 2011 at Elevenspitalfields.       

click to expand/collapse 

# 1 [1 November 2010]

Up to Sheffield for the Documentary Film Festival this Thursday. My paintings got me noticed by a young film maker who wanted to include me in his short on the controversial  Robin Hood Gardens Estate. Sadly me painting the picture got edited out but my head fills the screen for a minute or so as I talk and look (told I'm a natural)....looked good on the BFI big screen at the Southbank when it got it's first....they call them gigs, so let's see.   

View comment icon View 1 comment »

Comments on this post

Pictures please ! Would love to see ! Here is a picture of the robin hood estate from me to you .... http://www.rosalinddavis.co.uk/photo_5221162.html

posted on 2010-11-02 by Rosalind Davis

Peter Wylie, 'Smithson and Smithson one (with Le Corbusier flaking paint from apartment studio)', Oil on canvas, 2009. Photo: Peter Wylie. This is the the painting that deveoped after being invited to appear in the documentary film about the estate. Sold it last month so I guess need to do another for the show in April 2011.

[enlarge]
Peter Wylie, 'Smithson and Smithson one (with Le Corbusier flaking paint from apartment studio)', Oil on canvas, 2009. Photo: Peter Wylie. This is the the painting that deveoped after being invited to appear in the documentary film about the estate. Sold it last month so I guess need to do another for the show in April 2011.

# 2 [9 November 2010]

Well, the Robin Hood Gardens Estate film was very well received. I got praise from the editor too, but that's maybe because she spilled the beans on who chose to send film of my painting to the cutting room floor. Lots of claps, more than the Anselm Keifer, mind you much of the audience had left by then. Spent time on the nearby, and similarly controversial, Park Hill estate. Took many photographs, so could be the next painting.

View comment icon View 1 comment »

Comments on this post

Ah, you pick out the colour so well here, finding the complexity and subtelties there that often go unseen from the distances these buildings are usually photographed from. Here I can see your transformation of architectural 3-d space to canvas (2-d). It works for me, as image and as art. What can I say - beautiful!

posted on 2012-02-24 by Sam Bell

# 3 [15 November 2010]

Had a phone call on Friday late afternoon...thought it might be one of those annoying ones...instead a very polite voice asked if I was attending tonights Lynn Painter-Stainers Prize PV, Ive got a work included.....well, the angle was, I have been shortlisted, one of five for the final prize, of 13 grand...apparently this means I'll get one thou for being on that shortlist....just moved into a fantastic studio too, so that'll pay for it for best part of this next half year. Funny how good things are just around the corner for me at the moment.

# 4 [27 November 2010]

Went to see my Goldfinger four painting hanging in the Lynn Painter-Stainers Prize at their Guild home yesterday before it transfers to the WH Patterson Gallery in Mayfair. £1,000 prize has come in handy as I've just acquired a new studio in Deptford. Be even better if the Prize Winner sticker persuades someone to part with the money, and buy it, though it is priced far higher than most of the show......heavens know what people expect for their work once the gallery takes their cut, it's almost as though the prices are too low, making my price seem so inflated......doesn't make sense to take the time to execute the work, take it to the handing-in, have it selected and then get less than £500 for it....plenty of hoops to get that far, why expect so little in return? 

View comment icon View 1 comment »

Comments on this post

well done Peter and welcome to Deptford! Come see us at The Gifted weekend of Art and Design in Deptford, be nice to meet you in person! www.coregallery.co.uk

posted on 2010-11-30 by Rosalind Davis

# 5 [18 September 2011]

Having a go at this again. So much has happened since the last piece. For now, just an invitation to all readers to come along to the Threadneedle Prize 2011, opening on Thursday.

Peter Wylie, 'Tayler and Green one (with Le Corbusier flaking paint from Cite de Refuge)', Oil on canvas and flaking paint, Jan 2012. Photo: Peter Wylie. as part of my 'Buildings' series.....introducing some of the context of the building, in this case a very sticky muddy field

[enlarge]
Peter Wylie, 'Tayler and Green one (with Le Corbusier flaking paint from Cite de Refuge)', Oil on canvas and flaking paint, Jan 2012. Photo: Peter Wylie. as part of my 'Buildings' series.....introducing some of the context of the building, in this case a very sticky muddy field

# 6 [20 February 2012]

Painting, Architects and exhibitions have all been the story of the week.....well so much has happened since the last posting. It's almost as though I'm about starting this off again, but too much has happened and too much has been good... though at the moment it feels like holding the line.....so many things I thought were in place as a bridge to the events of next year that were to happen have been delayed.... an exhibition in Mayfair has become a casualty to the whim of the proprietor. and has been put on hold to maybe later in the year. It's been a maintain self-belief and to stay patient period of time...or is it just the cold in studio and grey light of winter????  

# 7 [21 February 2012]

Le Corbusier,s build in Briey France.....surrounded by trees....decided to paint an image of it as seen through foliage...the grid od the building against the chaos of leaves....one problem I've created for myself to solve....to depict the trees and to locate the building in the spaces remaining......reverse how it might ordinarily be painted.....getting closer to finish, but tomorrow will be make or break day for it's success or failure...can't wait

Peter Wylie, 'Goldfinger seven (with le Corbusier flaking paint from apartment studio)', Oil on canvas and flaking paint, 2011. Photo: Peter Wylie. here is Trellick Tower in all it's glory....or as Owen Hatherly said about my painting of Balfron Tower here in east London....Modernist estates were, we are told, 'alien', irruptions into our homely, traditional streets, illegible and totalitarian edifices, 'eyesores' that are best pulled down. Peter Wylie's paintings show something very different. In his paintings of Ernö Goldfinger's Balfron Tower, the life going on inside the building is as obvious as the proud, stark exteriors. In these paintings, and so it's implied, in the buildings too, everyday city life and a monumental modernism live together unassumingly.  

[enlarge]
Peter Wylie, 'Goldfinger seven (with le Corbusier flaking paint from apartment studio)', Oil on canvas and flaking paint, 2011. Photo: Peter Wylie. here is Trellick Tower in all it's glory....or as Owen Hatherly said about my painting of Balfron Tower here in east London....Modernist estates were, we are told, 'alien', irruptions into our homely, traditional streets, illegible and totalitarian edifices, 'eyesores' that are best pulled down. Peter Wylie's paintings show something very different. In his paintings of Ernö Goldfinger's Balfron Tower, the life going on inside the building is as obvious as the proud, stark exteriors. In these paintings, and so it's implied, in the buildings too, everyday city life and a monumental modernism live together unassumingly.  

# 8 [23 February 2012]

just had a call from the gallery to say that I've been successfull in the Lynn Painters-Stainers Prize 2012 here in London with this painting....more later

View comment icon View 2 comments »

Comments on this post

I can now see the colours emerging in this piece. It's odd - my first impression was of a bleak exterior. I can now see an interesting range of colour movement from the various greys of the concrete through to definite, more vivid colourings. The structured facades of the apartment seem to offer a really good vehicle for working colour in - like painted minimalist boxes...

posted on 2012-02-24 by Sam Bell

I have to say, I am very much in love with this style of architecture, and in particular much of the related Brutalist work. The honesty in the foregrounding of the raw materials, the external structuring that results from the management of the spaces of the apartments, the cold impersonality of the design concepts - just wonderful. As you say, though, all very utopian (now too much referred to as 'totalitarian'). The decay and the staining of the materials also interests me - no 'mellowing' with age here! Your paintings interest me in this context. Taking a paintbrush (if that's what you do) to represent a subject often seen as very impersonal is an interesting irony - is that how you see your work? I once created a sculpture ('Southbank') using marble, carved lovingly as a homage to the style, but of course the hand-carving and the material (marble, with its fine art history) distorts everything the architecture stands for. I must see if I can get to the exhibition.

posted on 2012-02-23 by Sam Bell

# 9 [27 February 2012]

am puzzled that when it comes to open submissions for art exhibitions/competitions there seems to be a development that says you pay your money to submit, and because there is such a large volume of submissions we can't get back to you unless you are successful. It would seem the 'cooler' the show, Whitechapel London Open and John Moore's the more it seems to be the case. So for the former there is this vague mention of 6 weeks of closing date if you haven't heard.....but we pay significant sums of money, the RA Summer Show with huge volumes of submmisions and Lynn Painter-Stainers still sends out a letter to all......so why no consistency and is this a disrespectful move or just a moan?    

View comment icon View 1 comment »

Comments on this post

A very valid moan. I think there is a lot of 'cool' attitude in the art world that seems to ride roughshod over plain respect and good manners. I think that if someone has taken the time to apply to take part in a show, then the least the organisers can do is respond. Not to is just rude.

posted on 2012-04-03 by Susan Kruse

# 10 [7 March 2012]

It's interesting how being an artist differs from one to the next. In the course of Hockney's recent remarks upon question of authenticity of the artist, the creation by the hand of the artist etc etc, regarding particular conceptual based (Hirst for example) practitioners who use assistants, as though painters in the past didn't, there is a thought that has come to my mind over many years of seeing post-grad shows and minor and major exhibitions of this work.....what do these artists do with their time. I'm constantly asking myself, did this student actually enjoy their degree course, what did they in fact learn....and we know that the answer lies not in acquiring craft skills....which is an okay by me answer....but having seen a recent mini exhibition for William Morris up in Leyton Library east London, a foretast of the re-opening of the Museum in Waltham Forest, an assistant and I discussed his working methods for production, and though he resented the fact his pieces largely sold to the wealthy......he wanted each worker to have a relationship with their work and avoid division of labour production values and the alienation from the work and disengagement it entails...keeping the prices high therefore, and contradiction to his aims, but that makes me wonder what de-crafted and de-skilled artists now do with all their spare time.....and does it make them happier?

Page 1 of 2 :

This project blog »

Peter Wylie

Am a painter who has been going around picking up pieces of Le Corbusier flaking paint to put on my paintings.