Viewing single post of blog Notes on the chlorophyll printing process

When I first came across these plants at the Botanical Garden in Tenerife I was convinced they’d be perfect for chlorophyll printing. It turned out they were pretty bad.

In this post I’ll share with you my research on suitable plants, and what went wrong with each one of them.

 

Spathiphyllum- Also known as Peace lily. This plant belongs to the Araceae family, which is often very appropriate for chlorophyll printing. Its big green flats leaves, which might occasionally turn yellow  made me believe this lily was perfect to work with. However, the outcome was really disappointing. First of all, it takes a lot of time to get any outcome with this plant,  and then, the resulting prints, lack of contrast and definition.

Philodendron imperial- Philodendros are a dysfunctional family. While some of them are absolutely fantastic for this process such as philodendron selloum and philodendron giganteum, the royal branch from this family are terrible for chlorophyll printing; avoid using philodendron imperial and pink princess.  Climbing philodendros are also pretty bad, including scandens and elongatum.

Devil’s Ivy –   Ivy tends to work very well for chlorophyll printing.  You might be able to get a quite good print in 2 July sunny days. Its green flat leaves are very convenient. It is very easy to source Ivy leaves from the streets and I used to think Ivy was the most convenient plant for the process until I came across the Devil’s variety. It just doesn’t work at all!

 

 


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