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This is the processs of constructing the mould piece by piece and testing what will work. I hoped to cast the horns into the head with this pour, but the cutting of the rubbere between horns an plaster sun disk would be too tricky, and I want to use the the rubber mould again for the moon disk with will be the next pour for Diana the huntress.
to see dry run and actual pour see following youtube clips.

https://youtu.be/pyz4UUsftyo

https://youtu.be/ZR1WcLQi9Ec

https://youtu.be/VeMYvVLNOcQ

https://youtu.be/GSDwTH4h4vE

https://youtu.be/lxXEEJKAnhY


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To create my Sun God I’ve decided that all the elements to be used in it’s construction need to be cast into the plaster in one pour to give more strength to the structure, rather than trying to fix them together as seperate pieces. I hunted around for a circular tin or plastic item for the mould to make the sun and the moon, which I want to have at the same dimensions 33 – 35cm diam, thus giving them equal status in size representing gender equality. I eventually found the perfect item – a large equine feed bucket make of thick recycled rubber wich has a curved bottom edge which is ideal for the profile I require. However, I haven’t actually made it yet, but it looks perfect. Using a plastic mould from a fellow students plaster face cast, with the cow horns inserted through cut out holes into the temples of the head, inserted so they almost touch in the middle will make sure a strong hold is taken when the plaster sets. Will put paper inside horns so the plaster will only travel into horns by 10cms either side. I will cut a hole in the middle of the floor of the bucket to match the outline profile of the face so it will hang through the profile which I will patch up with clay to prevent leakage of plaster. Will support the horns in postions for the duration while plaster sets. The Sun God is going to be Ocre in colour, and I’ll add dye to the plaster which gives a rich antique quality to the plaster.


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My work throughout this year has been connected to the power of the moon, in particular looking at feminist issues relating to the representation of the moon as goddesses, and her role in gender equality through time. The moon symbolizes the protection and fertility of women, and has been an integral part of Pagan, Druid, Dianic and Witchcraft cults throughout history. The Sun is represented as Gods, presenting us with a male equivalent to the moon, and by taking this concept into my art practice I set them in dialog with each other presiding over humanity. Images to follow


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Up to high dow about Degree Show approaching so quickly, there is so much work to do as a group, the catalogue in particular, we have a meeting tomorrow to get this nailed down. Also panicing about casting my figures, and had a very helpful tutorial with Robin today to discuss altenative options if I can’t cast them in time. Looking at metal leaf to apply on to them using various techniques. Want to apply a coating to harden them up a bit first, and the mounting on to granite plinths with take a bit of figuring out, but it’s all part of the journey I suppose. I’m dithering over Sun God or Devil for my horned head, and looking for a man’s face to take a mould from, or a plaster one that can be donated for me to work with…


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Time to retrieve my skinned Fawn from the freezer and get it fleshed, and tanned. These pics shown the process I have to go through to get to final skin ready for mounting. This is a traditional process used by American Indians using the brains of the animal to tan the hide. I’ve kept the skull of the fawn, and so have the brain intact. Will conduct this process at home as college Ethics board will have a fit if I’m doing this work there. Although an ethics form will need filled in for this work, Sun God, and Diana the Huntress as all use parts of animals.


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