An independent project space in the freedom of the Norfolk countryside. www.queenofhungary.co.uk

Artists can use the space to test ideas, experiment with new work, document installations and showcase their practice.

The space hosts artist and curator talks and is a dynamic resource offering classes supporting technical skills and seminars promoting professional development.

The Queen of Hungary started as an artist-led gallery in a medieval building in Norwich, 2001.


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We have our last event tomorrow for the Topography Disarranged exhibition. Judith Stewart, who wrote the show essay, will be In-Conversation with myself and Stephanie Douet at 7pm. She’ll be holding forth on her personal perspective on landscape, dislocation and place. We’re aiming for an informal conversation with erudite, lively, input from the audience and some of the participating artists.

I’ve heard there is prosecco and the Queen’s Hungarian biscuits on offer.

Dominique Rey


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Topography Disarranged opened last night and what a fantastic turn out. Good company, warm wine, great artwork, sunny, mellow evening light and horses in the field. Thanks to Chloe for letting us spruce up her studio as a second Project Space and to Stephanie for all her hard work alongside. Thanks also to the artists, who produced work in such a variey of materials that just fits so well together.

No pause for breathe as tonight we have the Moving Image Screening at 7pm – a great opportunity for last minute technical melt-down.

Dominique Rey


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Topography Disarranged opens tonight at 6pm. Naturally, despite months of careful planning and incremental, timetabled actions, we’ve had several days of frantic wall/floor painting, technical video and audio hiccups and finally work hanging. The first of the two rooms was pretty much complete last week, but we were unable to have access to the second space until Tuesday afternoon. Hot work in this warm weather. Thank you to artists Polly Cruse and Tim Simmons (who is in the show) for lending a helping hand.

Swanton Novers 16