a-n The Artists Information Company » Museums and Galleries

Saziso Phiri, founder of The Anti Gallery, Nottingham. Photo: Helen Kennedy
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The Anti Gallery, Nottingham: “Galleries still often feel like very white, middle-class spaces”

Saziso Phiri is celebrating one year of her pop-up gallery with a birthday party at Nottingham’s Rough Trade shop, followed by a series of free workshops in tandem with Nottingham Contemporary’s ‘The Place is Here’ show. Wayne Burrows talks to her about her mission to work with artists who operate beyond the usual art world structures.

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Jenni Lomax. Photo: Hugo Glendinning
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A Q&A with… Jenni Lomax, outgoing director of Camden Arts Centre

Jenni Lomax announced late last year that she is stepping down from her role at Camden Arts Centre, a position she has held for 26 years. Fisun Güner talks to the much admired director about working with artists, the importance of education in the gallery’s programme, and what she will do next.

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Turnpike Centre, Leigh, home to the Turnpike Gallery. Photo: Natalie Bradbury
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New era for Turnpike Gallery, Leigh: “Art and culture are a catalyst for the town”

Built in 1971 and all but abandoned by the cash-strapped local council in 2013, Turnpike Gallery in the former mining town of Leigh near Wigan, is entering a new stage in its history with the creation of a community interest company to run its programme. Natalie Bradbury speaks to arts manager Helen Stalker as the gallery relaunches with the Jerwood Drawing Prize touring exhibition.

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Willem De Kooning, Woman II, 1952, Oil, enamel and charcoal on canvas, 149.9 x 109.3 cm, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller, 1995, © 2016 The Willem de Kooning Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and DACS, London 2016. Digital image (c) 2016. The Museum of Modern Art, New York/Scala, Florence
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Abstract expressionism: a phenomenon, not a movement

The just-opened ‘Abstract Expressionism’ exhibition at the Royal Academy chronicles a key moment in 20th century art, presenting some of the period’s most iconic works. Fisun Güner reflects on the significance of this last great age of the artist as hero and tortured genius.

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